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hellebore / lenten rose syn. (Helleborus orientalis)

Helleborus × hybridus

hellebore / lenten rose syn. (Helleborus orientalis)

£6.99
Availability: in stock 9cm pot

Product description

  • Position: partial shade
  • Soil: heavy, neutral to alkaline soil
  • Rate of growth: average
  • Flowering period: February to April
  • Flower colour: variable, so could be white, pink, green, red, yellow or purple (or miscellaneous shades in between) and many are speckled
  • Hardiness: borderline hardy (may need winter protection)

    Producing pretty, pendent or outward-facing, saucer-shaped flowers that come in a wide range of colours (all of them lovely), but it is a bit of a lottery as to which one each plant will produce. They all appear however from February to April above the leathery, deep green leaves. They make attractive ground cover plants for areas of dappled shade under deciduous trees and shrubs and they prefer a heavy, neutral to alkaline soil.

    Unfortunately we can't guarantee what colour the flowers will be on each plant, but they are normally either white, green, yellow, pink, red, purple or slate black.

  • Garden care: Add lots of well-rotted leaf mould or organic matter to the planting hole. Cut the old leaves back down to the ground in January or February as this will show off the new emerging flowers to best effect. It will also help to get rid of foliar diseases such as Hellebore leaf spot. Apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted organic matter around the base of the plant in autumn and provide a top-dressing of general fertiliser each spring. Cut off the seed heads to prevent inferior seedlings colonising.

  • Harmful if eaten/skin irritant

“The reliable oriental hellebore - the backbone of woodland planting - guaranteed to perform in late winter giving weeks of flower and sustaining early bees”

Val Bourne - Garden Writer

“The reliable oriental hellebore - the backbone of woodland planting - guaranteed to perform in late winter giving weeks of flower and sustaining early bees”

Val Bourne - Garden Writer